Take Me Back

Take Me Back

As we were growing up, we always heard older people say “when I was a kid…” and we’d roll our eyes and ignore what they said. Well, I finally understand their point of view all these years later. I realized how my opinion on things changed drastically once I graduated and had to fend for myself.

As we were growing up, we always heard older people say “when I was a kid…” and we’d roll our eyes and ignore what they said. Well, I finally understand their point of view all these years later. I realized how my opinion on things changed drastically once I graduated and had to fend for myself. As I made these changes, I started to notice something else about my life, and over the past 5-10 years it’s gotten even worse. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has seen Terminator, but if you haven’t, it explains how machines will take over society in the future. Well guess what? We’re here!

Remember saying this? “Call my house and if I’m not there just leave a message.” If you weren’t home or didn’t want to be bothered, you didn’t have to be. Hell, there isn’t one of us out there who didn’t see a number pop up and think, “I’m letting the machine get that one.” Now, not only does everyone have their phones attached to their hips, but people even know when you’re ignoring them; “It says you read my message 40 minutes ago!” Not for nothing but there are hundreds of satellites in our orbit, any of which can pinpoint someone’s precise location down to a number of feet.

Understand first and foremost, it’s not about wanting to go back to my childhood, because let’s face it, who doesn’t want to do that? It’s about a simpler time, when the notion of privacy was still something that could be obtained. A time when we drove our bikes all around town and knew where everyone was hanging out at, based on the number of bikes in the front yard. We didn’t have Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, and passing notes back and forth was how we “followed” each other. The idea of sending a handwritten letter to someone now seems something only deemed necessary for psychopaths and prison inmates; although I bet they use email now as well.

As we become more in touch with our “social media status,” we lose ourselves in who and what we are. We no longer can embrace the moment and have fun in the now. Instead it’s “let me take a selfie real quick” or “I have to post this to my page so people know I can cook.” Oh, you just bought new sneakers? Please post 3 pics about it from different angles so I can see just how great they are. Enjoy that waterfall with your loved one, don’t stop to take “the perfect pic” for 10 minutes, and just enjoy the beauty of your surroundings.

Bored at work? Go on Facebook and like your friend’s post about Donald Trump being ignorant. Time to kill on your lunch break? Scroll through Instagram and peep at the pics of that girl you have/had a crush on. Long line at the DMV? Now is the perfect time to go on Twitter and see what late night drunken tweet Justin Bieber put up. Out to dinner with your significant other? Put that damn phone down and don’t take it back out!

As we settle into this social media crazed age, I don’t feel that eye contact and good conversation is asking too much. It’s as if we all forgot what life was like before we had cell phones, tablets and iPads. I implore everyone to be a little bit more like the kid you once were, back when the most important thing on your mind was the new smelly eraser on your pencil. We clearly can’t go back in time, as of now anyway, but we can all incorporate those old school ideas into this new school modern world. The text messages won’t go anywhere. Neither will the missed call from your drunken friend, or the FaceTime from your “bestie.”

Have real conversations with people, and talk to that old man at the bus stop while you’re waiting instead of playing your two thousand six hundred and fiftieth game of Angry Birds. Don’t text your parents! If you’re still lucky enough to have them in your life, go and see them. I’m not perfect, nor is any one man or woman walking this planet, but I’m working on being the best me I can be. I was born in 1986, and I purchased my first cell phone in 2004, and yet for those first 18 years I managed to survive without one. Mind boggling, isn’t it?

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